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Why Pay to Measure Code?

With so many software tools and utilities that will provide line of code metrics, why would anyone purchase a tool? The answer for CodeMeasure is easy and should help you decide if it is right for you and your organization. The two reasons to select CodeMeasure are: consistency of results and language independence.

And now the free trial version of CodeMeasure allows you to run an analysis for free. You can view, capture, and print the CLOC graph. You'll need to purchase a license to save the results to a spreadsheet file.

Consistency of Results

An important part of taking software development metrics is consistency. The first step toward consistency when measuring code is to measure the same way every time. CodeMeasure is uniquely designed to measure the evolution of software across multiple versions and not just a simple comparison of two versions that is typical. Running all your comparisons at the same time ensures you get a consistent measurement across versions without taking valuable engineering time building an environment to consistently measure 2 versions at a time and compiling results. Another unique advantage CodeMeasure offers, results from its language independence, allowing the same tool to measure Java development, PHP scripting, C, C++, or any line-based language and delivering consistent metrics on all your language-based development projects.

Language Independence

Language independence seems counter intuitive to the concept of accurately measuring software evolution because everyone knows that all lines of code aren't created equal. Similarly, all languages aren't the same, so the effort required for a line of PHP is different than the effort for a line of C++. The problem isn't with the metric, but with the analysis. If information on changed lines of code for the evolution of the Apache server (developed in C++) is compared with the same changed lines of code information for Ptolemy (developed in Java) does it tell me which language is better? Of course not, applying the same metric to two unrelated things doesn't lead to an accurate conclusion. The bottom line is having a standard set of metrics helps provide context and makes it easier to present an understandable analysis of development progress.

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